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Delayed Justice by Cara Putman

Delayed Justice by Cara PutmanJaime Nichols has her life in control. Her apartment is stark white, her friends are kept at just the right distance, and her job as a defense attorney fulfills her need for justice. And she’s about to tie up the last loose ends in her life by pressing charges against the man who abused her as a child. However, this decision throws her life into disarray.

Chandler Bolton enjoys his work helping military members readjust to civilian life, but a series of threatening phone calls makes him question his work. When he and his therapy dog are asked to help a young abuse victim, he and Jaime cross paths. And the danger builds.

Delayed Justice is another exciting legal thriller from Cara Putman! Once again, one of her novels seems to have anticipated current headlines, and Jaime’s story gives us great insight into victims of abuse and the troubles they face when seeking justice. Jaime and Chandler are intriguing and well matched, and their romance is tender and realistic. With plenty of twists and turns, the story kept me flipping pages. Another winner!

Today in World War II History—Nov. 27, 1943

Boeing B-29 Superfortress (US Air Force photo)

Boeing B-29 Superfortress (US Air Force photo)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 27, 1943: Brig. Gen. Kenneth Wolfe assumes command of new US Twentieth Bomber Command at Salina, KS, the first unit with B-29 Superfortress bombers.

US initiates accelerated landing craft program to meet needs of upcoming invasion of Europe (Operation Overlord, D-day).

Today in World War II History—Nov. 26, 1943

Messerschmitt Me 262A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force (US Air Force photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force (US Air Force photo)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 26, 1943: Hitler observes Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighter aircraft and insists it be developed as a “blitz bomber.”

Marines defeat Japanese in Battle of Piva Forks on Bougainville.

Off Algeria, Luftwaffe sinks British troop transport HMT Rohna with Hs 293 glide bomb; 1149/1755 US soldiers & British crew are killed.

Movie premiere of musical Girl Crazy, starring Mickey Rooney & Judy Garland.

Today in World War II History—Nov. 25, 1943

Thanksgiving menu from escort carrier USS Wake Island, 25 Nov 1943 (US Navy)

Thanksgiving menu from escort carrier USS Wake Island, 25 Nov 1943 (US Navy)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 25, 1943: US celebrates Thanksgiving.

Australians take Sattelberg, New Guinea.

Battle of Cape St. George: US Destroyer Squadron 23 under Capt. Arleigh Burke sinks 3 Japanese destroyers (Onami, Yugiri, Makinami) in the last naval battle in the Solomons.

Colossus Computer is first tested in Birmingham, England, the world’s first all-electric computer.

Today in World War II History—Nov. 24, 1943

US poster, 1943, honoring Dorie Miller, recipient of the Navy Cross for his actions at Pearl Harbor

US poster, 1943, honoring Dorie Miller, recipient of the Navy Cross for his actions at Pearl Harbor

75 Years Ago—Nov. 24, 1943: Escort carrier USS Liscome Bay is sunk by Japanese submarine I-175 off Makin in Gilbert Islands; 644 killed, including African-American Pearl Harbor hero Doris “Dorie” Miller.

Today in World War II History—Nov. 23, 1943

US Marines fighting on Betio, Tarawa Atoll, Nov 1943 (US National Archives)

US Marines fighting on Betio, Tarawa Atoll, Nov 1943 (US National Archives)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 23, 1943: US Marines secures Betio in Tarawa Atoll.

French Expeditionary Corps under Gen. Alphonse Juin arrives in Italy.

Philadelphia Phillies owner William Cox is banned from baseball for betting on his own team.

Today in World War II History—Nov. 22, 1943

Crowds celebrating release of Lebanese prisoners by French, 22 November 1943 (Public domain via Wikipedia)

Crowds celebrating release of Lebanese prisoners by French, 22 November 1943 (Public domain via Wikipedia)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 22, 1943: Lebanon’s Independence Day: Free French provisionally recognize Lebanese independence and release leaders.

RAF launches first 2000-ton night raid on Berlin—2000 Germans are killed and the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church is destroyed.

Sextant Conference begins in Cairo, Egypt with US Pres. Franklin Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Chinese Gen. Chiang Kai-shek.

Broadway lyricist Lorenz Hart (Rodgers & Hart) dies of pneumonia in New York City, age 48.

Chinese officers at the Mena House Hotel for the Sextant Conference, Cairo, Egypt, Nov 1943 (public domain via WW2 Database)

Chinese officers at the Mena House Hotel for the Sextant Conference, Cairo, Egypt, Nov 1943 (public domain via WW2 Database)

Today in World War II History—Nov. 21, 1943

Longues-sur-Mer gun battery, Longues-sur-Mer, France, September 2017 (Photo: Sarah Sundin)

Longues-sur-Mer gun battery, Longues-sur-Mer, France, September 2017 (Photo: Sarah Sundin)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 21, 1943: German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel is placed in command of Atlantic Wall defenses in France to defend against an Allied invasion.

Today in World War II History—Nov. 20, 1943

US Marines on landing beach at Tarawa, Gilbert Islands, 20 Nov 1943 (US Marine Corps photo)

US Marines on landing beach at Tarawa, Gilbert Islands, 20 Nov 1943 (US Marine Corps photo)

75 Years Ago—Nov. 20, 1943: In Gilbert Islands, US Marines land on Betio Island in Tarawa Atoll, and US Army lands on Makin and takes the island the same day.

British Eighth Army launches main offensive to cross Sangro River in Italy.

New song in Top Ten: “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’” from the musical Oklahoma!

US 165th Infantry lands at Butaritari, Makin Atoll, Gilbert Islands, 20 Nov 1943 (US National Archives)

US 165th Infantry lands at Butaritari, Makin Atoll, Gilbert Islands, 20 Nov 1943 (US National Archives)

Thanksgiving in World War II

Thanksgiving in World War II: how Thanksgiving was celebrated in the military and on the US home front during World War II.During World War II, political wrangling over the date to celebrate Thanksgiving, rationing and shortages, restrictions on travel, and disruptions to treasured traditions might have altered plans, but the spirit prevailed. The country paused to gather with family, reflect on blessings, and thank the Lord—the giver of all good gifts.

Norman Rockwell’s beautiful “Freedom from Want” painting made its debut in 1943 and has come to symbolize the holiday.

"Freedom from Want," by Norman Rockwell, 1943

“Freedom from Want,” by Norman Rockwell, 1943

Which Date Do We Celebrate?

In the summer of 1939, concerned retailers approached President Franklin Roosevelt. The Christmas shopping season never started before Thanksgiving (refreshing!). But in 1939, Thanksgiving—which had been celebrated on the last Thursday of November since 1863—would land on November 30, which would curtail revenue. In August 1939, Roosevelt issued a Presidential Proclamation changing Thanksgiving to the third Thursday of November.

This was a hugely unpopular decision. While 32 states adopted the earlier date, 16 refused to. In 1939, 1940, and 1941, two dates were celebrated, depending on the state. The later original date was nicknamed “Republican Thanksgiving” and the new early date “Democrat Thanksgiving” or “Franksgiving.”

By mid-1941, Roosevelt admitted the earlier date had no effect on retail sales figures. On October 6, 1941, the House of Representatives voted to move Thanksgiving back to the last Thursday of November. The Senate amended the bill on December 9, 1941 (despite the previous day’s declaration of war on Japan) to make the holiday fall on the fourth Thursday, an accommodation for five-Thursday Novembers. The president signed the legislation on December 26, 1941.

Thanksgiving in the Military

After receiving permission from the farm owner, these American airmen, stationed at an airbase in Norfolk, England, invade a turkey pen to choose their annual Thanksgiving dinner, 6 November 1943 (US Army Air Force photo)

After receiving permission from the farm owner, these American airmen, stationed at an airbase in Norfolk, England, invade a turkey pen to choose their annual Thanksgiving dinner, 6 November 1943 (US Army Air Force photo)

Throughout the war, the US military went out of its way to provide traditional meals for the men overseas. Thousands of turkeys and all the trimmings were sent to the front lines all over the world, and a serious effort was made to give each man a hot holiday meal, no matter where he served.

At Alexai Point, Attu, Aleutian Islands, officers of the US 77th Bomb Group and the 54th Fighter Group do justice to the traditional Thanksgiving dinner –the first one celebrated by military personnel on former American territory recaptured from the Japanese, 25 November 1943 (US Army Air Force photo)

At Alexai Point, Attu, Aleutian Islands, officers of the US 77th Bomb Group and the 54th Fighter Group do justice to the traditional Thanksgiving dinner –the first one celebrated by military personnel on former American territory recaptured from the Japanese, 25 November 1943 (US Army Air Force photo)

Sailors at sea, already blessed with the Navy’s excellent food, enjoyed sumptuous Thanksgiving meals, as seen from the 1943 menu from the escort carrier USS Wake Island.

Thanksgiving menu from escort carrier USS Wake Island, 25 Nov 1943 (US Navy)

Thanksgiving menu from escort carrier USS Wake Island, 25 Nov 1943 (US Navy)

Rationing and Shortages

In 1942, the first wartime Thanksgiving in America, only sugar was rationed, but shortages of meat and butter challenged housewives to create innovative menus. Many of the spices used in traditional foods were scarce, since they came from areas of the world conquered by the Japanese, and precious cargo space was reserved for more vital supplies.

US poster, WWII

US poster, WWII

In 1943 and 1944, the challenges increased. In early 1943, meat, cheese, butter and fats, and canned and processed foods were rationed. The clever cook saved ration stamps for the holiday and improvised substitutions. While poultry was never rationed in the US, turkey was scarce for Thanksgiving, since so many of the birds were shipped overseas for the servicemen’s feasts.

US poster, WWII

US poster, WWII

To Grandmother’s House We Go?

For most Americans, the family gathering is even more important than the turkey. During the war, many men and women served overseas and were missed at home. Also, gasoline and tire rationing prohibited people from traveling long distances by car, and civilian travel by train was strongly discouraged—and seats were often unavailable. Gatherings might have been smaller, but no less appreciated.

US poster, WWII

US poster, WWII

Football

That American tradition—the Thanksgiving football game—was battered by the war. Professional and college teams were decimated by the draft, and many professional teams closed down for the duration, including the Detroit Lions and Cleveland Rams. The Philadelphia Eagles and the Pittsburgh Steelers combined for the 1943 season, a team nicknamed the “Steagles.”

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Rubber was one of the most critical wartime shortages, since 92 percent of America’s supply came from Japanese-occupied lands. On November 13, 1942, Macy’s department stores ceremonially handed over their famous giant rubber balloons used for their annual parade, including Superman, who had only made his debut in 1939. The balloons were shredded for scrap rubber, and the parade was cancelled for the duration, not to resume again until November 1945.

US poster, WWII

US poster, WWII

We Gather Together

No matter where they were or what hardships they faced, Americans still gathered together to celebrate and to give thanks.

Thanksgiving grace, 1942 (US Library of Congress)

Thanksgiving grace, 1942 (US Library of Congress)

Resources

“Congress Establishes Thanksgiving,” on US National Archives website.

Crowley, Patrice. “Thankful Anyway.” America in WWII magazine, December 2009.

“Stories about a World War II Thanksgiving.” On Fold3.com website, 25 August 2016.