b-blog

Posts Categorized: WWII Articles

Christmas in World War II – The Military

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. This week’s post looks at Christmas for American servicemen and women, and next week’s will look at Christmas on the Home Front. Christmas during World War… Read more »

70th Anniversary – Remember Pearl Harbor!

Seventy years ago, on December 6, 1941, twelve B-17 Flying Fortresses left Hamilton Field, north of San Francisco, bound for their new station on Mindanao in the Philippines. My great-uncle, Roderick M. Stewart, served as a second lieutenant on one of the crews. The first leg of their journey would take them to Hickam Field in Honolulu. Weighted… Read more »

If Only They’d Listened

On December 7, 1941, two Army Air Force radar operators on Oahu reported a blip on their screen, which looked like dozens of planes approaching Pearl Harbor. They reported it to Lt. Kermit Tyler, who had been on the job only two days. Tyler knew a squadron of twelve B-17 Flying Fortresses was due to… Read more »

Guest Post: Thankful For Those Who’ve Come Before Us by Tricia Goyer

For Veteran’s Day, I’m thrilled to have author Tricia Goyer as a guest blogger. Thankful For Those Who’ve Come Before Us Tricia Goyer In 2000 I was on vacation with friends when I heard a heart-breaking story. In a small village called Mauthausen in northern Austria, 55 years earlier, prior white flakes fell from the… Read more »

Port Chicago – Desegregation of the Navy

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – the Mutiny Trial

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – the Work Stoppage

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – the Explosion

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

The Port Chicago Disaster – Introduction

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, 202 of whom were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Lessons from the 1940s – Labor Counts

On Labor Day I thought it was appropriate to honor the vital role of production in the Allied victory in World War II. The United States was well situated to become the “Arsenal of Democracy.” Other than a few random bombings from Japanese submarine-based planes and shellings from submarines, America was free from damage. The… Read more »