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Posts Categorized: WWII Articles

The B-17 Flying Fortress, Part 1

B-17 Shoo Shoo Baby of the US Air Force Museum, Dayton OH (USAF Photo) Few World War II airplanes have captured the imagination like the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress. Springtime means the B-17s are on tour! Several organizations have beautifully restored B-17s that tour the country. For years, I’ve enjoyed walking through these planes, and last… Read more »

Happy V-E Day Anniversary!

Sixty-seven years ago today, the Allies celebrated Victory in Europe. People went to church and prayed. Bells rang. Parades rejoiced through small towns and cities. The cost of victory was high. Tens of millions were killed in battle. More tens of millions were murdered and starved in concentration camps. And more millions perished as civilian… Read more »

Girl Scouts in World War II

This week, the Girl Scouts celebrated their 100th birthday. Founded by Juliette Gordon Low in Savannah, Georgia on March 12, 1912, the Girl Scout organization promoted character building through outdoor activities, community service, arts and crafts, and homemaking skills. When World War II started, the Girl Scouts were well poised to take a solid role on… Read more »

Christmas in World War II – The Home Front

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. This post looks at Christmas on the US Home Front. See also: Christmas for American servicemen and women. Families on the US Home Front dealt with… Read more »

Christmas in World War II – The Military

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. This post looks at Christmas for American servicemen and women. See also: Christmas on the US Home Front. Christmas during World War II found Americans on… Read more »

70th Anniversary – Remember Pearl Harbor!

Seventy years ago, on December 6, 1941, twelve B-17 Flying Fortresses left Hamilton Field, north of San Francisco, bound for their new station on Mindanao in the Philippines. My great-uncle, Roderick M. Stewart, served as a second lieutenant on one of the crews. The first leg of their journey would take them to Hickam Field in Honolulu. Weighted… Read more »

If Only They’d Listened

On December 7, 1941, two Army Air Force radar operators on Oahu reported a blip on their screen, which looked like dozens of planes approaching Pearl Harbor. They reported it to Lt. Kermit Tyler, who had been on the job only two days. Tyler knew a squadron of twelve B-17 Flying Fortresses was due to… Read more »

Guest Post: Thankful For Those Who’ve Come Before Us by Tricia Goyer

For Veteran’s Day, I’m thrilled to have author Tricia Goyer as a guest blogger. Thankful For Those Who’ve Come Before Us Tricia Goyer In 2000 I was on vacation with friends when I heard a heart-breaking story. In a small village called Mauthausen in northern Austria, 55 years earlier, prior white flakes fell from the… Read more »

Port Chicago – Desegregation of the Navy

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – the Mutiny Trial

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »