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Posts Categorized: WWII Articles

Happy V-E Day Anniversary!

Sixty-six years ago today, the Allies celebrated Victory in Europe. People went to church and prayed. Bells rang. Parades rejoiced through small towns and cities. The cost of victory was high. Tens of millions were killed in battle. More tens of millions were murdered and starved in concentration camps. And more millions perished as civilian… Read more »

B-17 Flight Video Coming Soon…

View of Mount Diablo from the nose compartment of B-17G Aluminum Overcast I know, I know. I promised to have the video of my B-17 flight posted today. Due to technical difficulties – the difficulty being that I’m not technical – it won’t be up today. But soon. Very soon. Me standing under the chin… Read more »

The B-17 Flying Fortress, Part 2 – Crew

B-17G Shoo Shoo Baby at the US Air Force Museum, Dayton OH USAF Photo Few World War II airplanes have captured the imagination like the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress. Today I have the privilege in taking a flight in Aluminum Overcast, the restored B-17 owned by the Experimental Aircraft Association (http://www.b17.org/). This is the second of… Read more »

The B-17 Flying Fortress, Part 1

B-17 Shoo Shoo Baby of the US Air Force Museum, Dayton OH (USAF Photo) Few World War II airplanes have captured the imagination like the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress. Next Monday, May 2, I’ll have the privilege in taking a flight in Aluminum Overcast, the restored B-17 owned by the Experimental Aircraft Association (http://www.b17.org/). Over… Read more »

Medications in World War II

Last week I was a guest blogger on Redwood’s Medical Edge, a wonderful blog on medical topics for writers, posting a three-part series on medications in World War II. In Part 1, I discussed general principles of medication use in the 1940s – generic/brand names, dosage forms, administration, and measurements – all very different than… Read more »

Make It Do – Stocking Shortages in World War II

For American women, a shortage that affected daily life was the shortage of stockings. Before the war, no well-dressed woman was seen in public without hose, and silk stockings were a necessary part of every woman’s wardrobe. Nylons Introduced Nylon was invented by DuPont in 1938, and nylon stockings were demonstrated at the 1939 New York… Read more »

Make It Do – Shoe Rationing in World War II

During World War II, many items were rationed in the United States, including shoes. Why Shoes? Due to the serious rubber shortage (see http://www.sarahsundin.com/make-it-do-tire-rationing-in-world-war-ii/), footwear made of rubber or with rubber soles was rationed or unavailable. Also, the military had a high need for leather, not just for shoes and combat boots but for those… Read more »

Make It Do – Rationing of Fats & Oils in World War II

Rationing was part of life on the US Home Front during World War II. Along with gasoline, sugar, coffee, processed foods, meat, and cheese—fats and oils were rationed. To help produce the glycerin needed by the military, housewives also collected kitchen waste fats. Why Fats? Shortages of butter and oils began early in the war…. Read more »

Make It Do – Meat and Cheese Rationing in World War II

This week I’m celebrating the second anniversary of my blog! Leave a comment on any of this week’s posts here or on Facebook for a chance to win a copy of your choice of my three novels: A Distant Melody, A Memory Between Us (available now), or Blue Skies Tomorrow (coming August 2011). Please leave… Read more »

Make It Do – Rationing of Canned Goods in World War II

Rationing of processed foods was an important part of life on the US Home Front. A complex and constantly changing system kept the grocery shopper on her toes. Why processed foods? Tin was short. The Japanese controlled 70 percent of the world’s tin supply. Tin’s resistance to temperature, shock, and moisture made it an ideal… Read more »