b-blog

Posts Categorized: WWII Articles

Port Chicago – The Work Stoppage

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – The Explosion

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

The Port Chicago Disaster – Introduction

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Happy Independence Day! Looking Back for Inspiration

Happy Independence Day! This poster seemed appropriate with its Revolutionary War theme. In 1943, the United States and the rest of the world, faced its greatest threat. Germany, Japan, and Italy with the other Axis powers, had conquered vast areas of the globe. The Allies were beginning to make progress, clearing North Africa, invading Sicily… Read more »

Courage Under Fire – US Hospitals at Anzio

Courage under fire. When we hear that phrase, we picture a soldier in the trenches, a sailor manning his guns, or a pilot dodging enemy fighter planes. But how about nurses and physicians? In my novel, On Distant Shores, the hero serves as a pharmacist in the US 93rd Evacuation Hospital in World War II…. Read more »

Christmas in World War II – The Home Front

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. Last week’s post looked at Christmas for American servicemen and women, and this week’s looks at Christmas on the Home Front. Families on the Home Front dealt… Read more »

Christmas in World War II – The Military

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. This week’s post looks at Christmas for American servicemen and women, and next week’s will look at Christmas on the Home Front. Christmas during World War… Read more »

Thanksgiving in World War II

Thanksgiving in World War II: how Thanksgiving was celebrated in the military and on the US home front during World War II.

During World War II, political wrangling over the date to celebrate Thanksgiving, rationing and shortages, restrictions on travel, and disruptions to treasured traditions might have altered plans, but the spirit prevailed. The country paused to gather with family, reflect on blessings, and thank the Lord—the giver of all good gifts. Norman Rockwell’s beautiful “Freedom from… Read more »

Pharmacy in World War II – The Military

Pharmacy at Percy Jones General Hospital, Battle Creek, Michigan While researching the military medical system for my World War II novels, I read about physicians and nurses, dentists and veterinarians. But where were the pharmacists? In the civilian world, the physician prescribes medication, the pharmacist purchases, compounds, and dispenses, and the patient or nurse administers…. Read more »

Pharmacy in World War II – The Drug Store

In my novel, On Distant Shores, which officially releases August 1, 2013, the hero serves an Army pharmacist in World War II. As a pharmacist, I found much about my profession has changed, but some things have not—a personal concern for patients, the difficult balance between health care and business, and the struggle to gain respect… Read more »