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Posts Tagged: World War II

Thanksgiving in World War II: how Thanksgiving was celebrated in the military and on the US home front during World War II.

Thanksgiving in World War II

During World War II, political wrangling over the date to celebrate Thanksgiving, rationing and shortages, restrictions on travel, and disruptions to treasured traditions might have altered plans, but the spirit prevailed. The country paused to gather with family, reflect on blessings, and thank the Lord—the giver of all good gifts. Norman Rockwell’s beautiful “Freedom from Want” painting made its debut in 19... Read Article
A Tribute to Rosie the Riveter, on Sarah Sundin's blog

A Tribute to Rosie the Riveter

Rosie the Riveter has come to represent the women of World War II. We all love Rosie. She’s strong but cute. She has biceps, but she curls her hair and does her nails. And look at that chin—she won’t let anyone tell her what she can or can’t do. She is woman; hear her riveting gun. The 1940 census counted 132 million people in the USA. During the war, 11 million men and women served in the armed forces. Even ... Read Article
Make It Do - Meat and Cheese Rationing in World War II - on Sarah Sundin's blog

Make It Do – Meat and Cheese Rationing in World War II

Rationing of meat and cheese was an important part of life on the US Home Front. A complex and constantly changing system kept grocery shoppers on their toes. Why meat and cheese? The United States produced meat and cheese for her civilians and military, and also for her Allies. During World War I, food shortages were a serious problem, with hoarding, escalating prices, and rushes on stores. When World War II started... Read Article
Make It Do - Rationing of Butter, Fats & Oils in World War II - on Sarah Sundin's blog

Make It Do – Rationing of Butter, Fats & Oils in World War II

Rationing was part of life on the US Home Front during World War II. Along with gasoline, sugar, coffee, canned and processed foods, meat, and cheese—butter, fats, and oils were rationed. To help produce the glycerin needed by the military, housewives also collected kitchen waste fats. Why Fats? Shortages of butter and oils began early in the war. Most cooking oils came from Pacific lands conquered by the Japanese,... Read Article
Make It Do - Rationing of Canned Goods in World War II - on Sarah Sundin's blog

Make It Do – Rationing of Canned Goods in World War II

  Rationing of processed foods was an important part of life on the US Home Front. A complex and constantly changing system kept the grocery shopper on her toes. Why processed foods? Tin was short. The Japanese controlled 70 percent of the world’s tin supply. Tin’s resistance to temperature, shock, and moisture made it an ideal packaging material. The US military used it for ration tins, ammunition boxes, pl... Read Article
Shoe Rationing in World War II, on Sarah Sundin's blog

Make It Do – Shoe Rationing in World War II

During World War II, many items were rationed in the United States, including shoes. Why Shoe Rationing? Due to the serious rubber shortage (Make It Do-Tire Rationing in World War II), footwear made of rubber or with rubber soles was rationed or unavailable. Also, the military had a high need for leather, not just for shoes and combat boots, but for those popular leather flight jackets. As a result, civilians made do... Read Article
War Bonds in World War II - on Sarah Sundin's blog

World War II War Bonds

Eighty years ago this week, the United States held its first War Loan Drive. The Second World War cost the United States $300 billion dollars, with the federal budget rising from $9 billion in 1939 to $98 billion in 1945. How was the nation to pay for that? Taxes were increased with an additional 5 percent Victory Tax. To assure payment, on June 10, 1943 the government approved the first automatic deduction of taxes ... Read Article
Make It Do - Coffee Rationing in World War II - on Sarah Sundin's blog

Make It Do – Coffee Rationing in World War II

Eighty years ago, coffee rationing began in the United States. Although not necessary for survival—though that’s debatable—coffee has been a staple in the American diet since the Boston Tea Party, and coffee rationing was extremely unpopular. Why Coffee? During World War II, Latin America produced bumper crops of coffee beans, and those countries were Allies or neutral. However, all coffee came to America by se... Read Article
Lessons from the 1940s - No Complaints - on Sarah Sundin's blog

Lessons from the 1940s – No Complaints

They waded ashore in chest-deep water in Algeria and took shelter behind sand dunes. Snipers and strafing fighter planes aimed for them. They ate cold rations and dug slit trenches and dealt with fleas, mosquitoes, lice, and flies. And they were women. When I was researching nursing in the Mediterranean Theater (North Africa, Sicily, and Italy) in World War II, I was struck by the conditions these young women worked ... Read Article
Victory Gardens in World War II, on Sarah Sundin's blog

Victory Gardens in World War II

For the average American in World War II, the Victory Garden was a practical way to contribute to the war effort. Some 20 million Victory Gardens were planted (US population in 1940 was 132 million), and by 1943, these little plots produced 40 percent of all vegetables consumed in the US. It’s estimated that 9-10 million tons of vegetables were grown. The Need for Victory Gardens Wartime needs stretched agricul... Read Article