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Posts Categorized: WWII Articles

The Port Chicago Disaster – Introduction

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Happy Independence Day! Looking Back for Inspiration

Happy Independence Day! This poster seemed appropriate with its Revolutionary War theme. In 1943, the United States and the rest of the world, faced its greatest threat. Germany, Japan, and Italy with the other Axis powers, had conquered vast areas of the globe. The Allies were beginning to make progress, clearing North Africa, invading Sicily… Read more »

Courage Under Fire – US Hospitals at Anzio

Courage under fire. When we hear that phrase, we picture a soldier in the trenches, a sailor manning his guns, or a pilot dodging enemy fighter planes. But how about nurses and physicians? In my novel, On Distant Shores, the hero serves as a pharmacist in the US 93rd Evacuation Hospital in World War II…. Read more »

Christmas in World War II – The Home Front

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. Last week’s post looked at Christmas for American servicemen and women, and this week’s looks at Christmas on the Home Front. Families on the Home Front dealt… Read more »

Christmas in World War II – The Military

Although World War II did not take a holiday, Americans at home and abroad did their best to celebrate Christmas. Wartime separations and deprivations made festivities poignant and bittersweet. This week’s post looks at Christmas for American servicemen and women, and next week’s will look at Christmas on the Home Front. Christmas during World War… Read more »

Thanksgiving in World War II

Despite the difficulties, dangers, and deprivations of the World War II era, Americans still gave thanks. Norman Rockwell’s beautiful “Freedom from Want” painting made its debut in 1943 and has come to symbolize the holiday. During the war, political wrangling over the date, rationing and shortages, restrictions on travel, and disruptions to treasured traditions might… Read more »

Lessons from the 1940s – Labor Counts

On Labor Day I thought it was appropriate to honor the vital role of production in the Allied victory in World War II. The United States was well situated to become the “Arsenal of Democracy.” Other than a handful of bombings from Japanese submarine-based planes and shellings from submarines, America was undamaged. The factories and… Read more »

Hospitalization in World War II – Evacuation of the Wounded

Unlike the US Fifth Army, Hutch crossed the Volturno River backward. While the Allies crossed under machine-gun fire eleven days earlier, Hutch rode in a jeep, turned in the front seat to face little Lucia. Her litter was strapped across the backseat, while two more litters were strapped on the hood. A furrow raced up… Read more »

Hospitalization in World War II – Mobile and Fixed Hospitals

Hutch crossed his arms over his soggy mackinaw and gave Bergie half a smile. “You said you’d take over. Ever pitch a tent before?” “In Boy Scouts.” The surgeon raised a three-finger salute. “On my honor–“ “A big old Army ward tent?” “Nope. But I’m willing to get dirty. What’s mud compared to the blood… Read more »

Hospitalization in World War II – Chain of Evacuation

Planes thundered overhead, artillery rumbled in the distance, and cries of wounded soldiers pierced Georgie’s ears. “Coming through.” Two medics rushed past with a litter. A man writhed on top, a shock of red on his gray-green field jacket. Another medic assisted a soldier who clutched his twisted, bloodstained arm to his chest. Georgie took… Read more »