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Today in
World War II History

Today in World War II History—February 27, 1944

Cartoon giving information on new rationing tokens, February 1944 (US government publication)

Cartoon giving information on new rationing tokens, February 1944 (US government publication)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 27, 1944: Alamo Scouts (US Sixth Army) enter combat, conducting reconnaissance of Los Negros in the Admiralty Islands.

US issues plastic tokens to make change for ration stamps—blue for processed foods, red for meats and fats. Read more: “Make It Do—Rationing of Canned Goods in World War II.”

Today in World War II History—February 26, 1944

Poster for the US Navy Nurse Corps, WWII (US Naval History & Heritage Command)

Poster for the US Navy Nurse Corps, WWII (US Naval History & Heritage Command)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 26, 1944: Japanese retreat from Sinzweya, Burma, ending “Battle of the Admin Box,” as British troops relieve trapped Indian troops.

US Navy nurses are given actual commissioned rank instead of relative rank. Read more about relative rank here: Army Nursing in World War II: Training and Rank.

Today in World War II History—February 25, 1944

Strike photo of Regensburg after 25 February 1944 raid by US Eighth and Fifteenth Air Forces (US Air Force photo)

Strike photo of Regensburg after 25 February 1944 raid by US Eighth and Fifteenth Air Forces (US Air Force photo)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 25, 1944: First time US Eighth Air Force (based in England) and US Fifteenth Air Force (based in Italy) bomb the same target—Regensburg, Germany, in “Big Week” operations.

Today in World War II History—February 24, 1944

Merrill’s Marauders in Burma, 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

Merrill’s Marauders in Burma, 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 24, 1944: Merrill’s Marauders (US guerrillas) enter Burma to start raids in the Hukawng Valley.

Today in World War II History—February 23, 1944

Maj. Gen. Lucian Truscott, Dec. 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

Maj. Gen. Lucian Truscott, Dec. 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 23, 1944: Maj. Gen. Lucian Truscott assumes command of US VI Corps at Anzio.

First US Army blood bank in the Mediterranean Theater opens at Naples medical center.

American Red Cross poster encouraging blood donation, WWII

American Red Cross poster encouraging blood donation, WWII

Today in World War II History—February 22, 1944

US Marines on Eniwetok, Feb 1944 (US Marine Corps photo: 72434)

US Marines on Eniwetok, Feb 1944 (US Marine Corps photo: 72434)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 22, 1944: US secures Eniwetok Atoll and all Marshall Islands, the first time the Japanese lose prewar territory.

Gen. Mark Clark arrives at Anzio in Italy and removes Maj. Gen. John Lucas from command of US VI Corps.

Stalin announces that the Soviets have reclaimed three-quarters of the territory captured by the Germans.

Today in World War II History—February 21, 1944

A US Marine dirty after two days of fighting on Eniwetok, Feb 1944 (US National Archives: 26-G-3394)

A US Marine dirty after two days of fighting on Eniwetok, Feb 1944 (US National Archives: 26-G-3394)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 21, 1944: Japanese Prime Minister Hideki Tojo removes Field Marshal Hajime Sugiyama from position as Chief of Army General Staff and takes his place.

US secures Eniwetok Island in Eniwetok Atoll, and lands on and takes 7 other islands in the atoll.

Today in World War II History—February 20, 1944

Map of Allied bombing targets during Operation Argument “Big Week,” February 20-26, 1944 (Source: US Air Force)

Map of Allied bombing targets during Operation Argument “Big Week,” February 20-26, 1944 (Source: US Air Force)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 20, 1944: Allies launch Operation Argument (“Big Week”), a week-long aerial attack which devastates the German aircraft industry; RAF bombers fly 2300 sorties; US Eighth and Ninth Air Forces fly 3300 sorties from England; US Fifteenth Air Force flies 400 sorties from Italy.

Norwegian resistance fighters blow up ferry Hydro carrying the only German shipment of heavy water (for atomic bombs) on Lake Tinnsjø, Norway.

D/F Hydro railway ferry at Mæl, Norway, 1925 (public domain via Anders Beer Wilse/Norwegian Museum of Cultural History)

D/F Hydro railway ferry at Mæl, Norway, 1925 (public domain via Anders Beer Wilse/Norwegian Museum of Cultural History)

Today in World War II History—February 19, 1944

Japanese ships burning at Rabaul, Feb 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

Japanese ships burning at Rabaul, Feb 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 19, 1944: The major Japanese air & naval base at Rabaul is officially neutralized by Allied forces as the last Japanese planes are moved to Truk.

Today in World War II History—February 18, 1944

Mosquito aircraft of RNZAF bombing prison (center left) at Amiens, France, 18 February 1944 (United Kingdom government photo)

Mosquito aircraft of RNZAF bombing prison (center left) at Amiens, France, 18 February 1944 (United Kingdom government photo)

80 Years Ago—Feb. 18, 1944: RAF launches Operation Jericho as Mosquitos & Typhoons bomb the German prison in Amiens holding members of the French resistance; of 717 prisoners, 102 are killed and 258 escape.

Peak of German counterattack at Anzio, as they come within six miles of the sea by noon, but are turned back by artillery and infantry by the end of the day.

Hitler dissolves the Abwehr, German military intelligence, after evidence of infiltration by Allied agents and resistance members; functions taken over by Reich Main Security Office (RSHA).

Embers in the London Sky cover
“Another masterful installment in Sundin’s roster of WWII novels.”
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