b-blog

Today in World War II History—Feb. 27, 1942

Seaplane tender USS Langley being abandoned after being damaged by Japanese bombs, Battle of Java Sea, 27 Feb 1942 (US Naval History and Heritage Command)

Seaplane tender USS Langley being abandoned after being damaged by Japanese bombs, Battle of Java Sea, 27 Feb 1942 (US Naval History and Heritage Command)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 27, 1942: Battle of Java Sea begins—Allied ships fail to prevent Japanese landing at Java, take heavy losses.

Nazis order construction of gas chambers at Auschwitz.

Seattle school board accepts forced resignation of Japanese-American teachers.

Today in World War II History—Feb. 26, 1942

Ribbon for the Army’s Distinguished Unit Citation

Ribbon for the Army’s Distinguished Unit Citation

75 Years Ago—Feb. 26, 1942: Army Distinguished Unit Citation authorized, worn above right breast pocket.

3000 Japanese residents of San Pedro and Terminal Island, CA ordered to leave in 3 days.

Academy Awards: best picture How Green Was My Valley, best actress Joan Fontaine in Suspicion, best actor Gary Cooper in Sergeant York, best director John Ford for How Green Was My Valley, first Oscars awarded for documentaries.

Today in World War II History—Feb. 25, 1942

Antiaircraft fire over Los Angeles, CA, 24-25 February 1942 (California State Archives)

Antiaircraft fire over Los Angeles, CA, 24-25 February 1942 (California State Archives)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 25, 1942: “Battle of Los Angeles”: In Los Angeles, false reports of enemy planes (actually a rogue weather balloon) lead to firing of antiaircraft guns during night of Feb. 24-25; 5 civilians die from resulting car accidents or heart attacks.

British Gen. Sir Archibald Wavell named Commander in Chief, India.

President Roosevelt bans racial discrimination in defense industry.

Today in World War II History—Feb. 24, 1942

TBD-1 Devastator bomber over Wake Island during American attack, 24 Feb 1942 (US National Archives)

TBD-1 Devastator bomber over Wake Island during American attack, 24 Feb 1942 (US National Archives)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 24, 1942: Soviet sub ShCh-213 sinks Bulgarian passenger ship Struma; 766 Jewish refugees die after having been refused admission to Palestine and Turkey.

Canada orders removal of all Japanese-Canadians from west coast to inland communities.

USS Enterprise group strikes Wake Island, sinking two Japanese guard boats.

Today in World War II History—Feb. 23, 1942

US B-17 Flying Fortress "Swamp Ghost" undergoing restoration at the Pacific Aviation Museum. (Photo: Sarah Sundin, 7 Nov 2016)

US B-17 Flying Fortress “Swamp Ghost” undergoing restoration at the Pacific Aviation Museum. (Photo: Sarah Sundin, 7 Nov 2016)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 23, 1942: US Fifth Air Force B-17s, based in Townsville, Australia make first attack on Rabaul; 1 crash-lands in New Guinea swamp—Swamp Ghost now in Pacific Aviation Museum at Pearl Harbor.

Japanese sub I-17 fires at Bankline Oil Refinery at Ellwood near Santa Barbara CA; little damage; first attack on US mainland in war.

US Army Air Forces approve “winged star” emblem in shape of a V for victory. 

Today in World War II History—Feb. 22, 1942

Air Marshal Sir Arthur Harris, 1943 (National Archives, United Kingdom)

Air Marshal Sir Arthur Harris, 1943 (National Archives, United Kingdom)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 22, 1942: Air Marshal Sir Arthur “Bomber” Harris takes command of RAF Bomber Command.

President Roosevelt orders Gen. Douglas MacArthur to leave Bataan for Australia.

New car sales end in the US.

Today in World War II History—Feb. 21, 1942

San Francisco Examiner headlines, San Francisco, CA, 22 Feb 1942 (US National Archives)

San Francisco Examiner headlines, San Francisco, CA, 22 Feb 1942 (US National Archives)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 21, 1942: House of Representatives begins hearings about removal of Japanese-Americans from West Coast.

German spy Bernard Julius Otto Kuehn convicted of espionage for sending information about Pearl Harbor to the Japanese before and during the attack.

New song in Top Ten: “I Don’t Want to Walk Without You.”

When Tides Turn Pre-Order – Drawing Winners!

Thank you to everyone who pre-ordered When Tides Turn and filled out the form! I hope you’re enjoying your downloadable goodies. The group video conference will be scheduled at the end of March, and everyone who filled out the form will receive an email with instructions when we have the final details.

All entries were placed in a drawing to name a character in the next novel I’ll write–The Sky Above Us, Book 2 in the Sunrise at Normandy series. The three winners will also receive a free copy of the book when it releases in early 2019. I will contact the winners to arrange for the character names. The three winners are…

Vicki Caruana

Joanna Hiemstra

Corinne Reynolds

However…I decided to throw in ONE extra winner. Ruth Lucca sent me not one, but TWENTY photos of her When Tides Turn origami ship, photographed at the former US Navy training vessel, USS Recruit, in San Diego! Here is a sampling of her photos. Aren’t they fun?

Today in World War II History—Feb. 20, 1942

Lt. Edward "Butch" O'Hare in front of a Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat fighter, spring 1942 (US Navy photo)

Lt. Edward “Butch” O’Hare in front of a Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat fighter, spring 1942 (US Navy photo)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 20, 1942: First US Eighth Air Force officers arrive in England.

Japanese land on Portuguese East Timor and Dutch West Timor in East Indies.

Lt. Edward “Butch” O’Hare of USS Lexington shoots down five Japanese planes in six minutes in his F4F Wildcat over Rabaul, becoming the first US Navy ace of war, receives Medal of Honor.

Today in World War II History—Feb. 19, 1942

Exclusion Order posted at First and Front Streets in San Francisco directing removal of persons of Japanese ancestry, 1 April 1942 (US National Archives)

Exclusion Order posted at First and Front Streets in San Francisco directing removal of persons of Japanese ancestry, 1 April 1942 (US National Archives)

75 Years Ago—Feb. 19, 1942: President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, authorizing designation of military zones and removal of certain persons, which will lead to the internment of Japanese-Americans.

Largest-ever attack on Australia: 242 Japanese aircraft bomb Darwin and Broome, sinking 12 ships, destroying almost all aircraft, and killing 200.

Canadian parliament passes conscription law.

Explosion of MV Neptuna, hit during the Japanese air raid on Darwin, Australia, 19 February 1942 (Royal Australian Navy photo)

Explosion of MV Neptuna, hit during the Japanese air raid on Darwin, Australia, 19 February 1942 (Royal Australian Navy photo)