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Posts Tagged: World War II

The Land Beneath Us – Tour of Tullahoma, Tennessee

To celebrate the release of The Land Beneath Us, I’m conducting a photo tour of locations from the novel that I saw on my research trips to England, Normandy, Tennessee and more. From the previous books in the Sunrise at Normandy series: Tour of London Part 1 Tour of London, Part 2 Tour: D-Day at… Read more »

A Dog, the President’s Son, and a Grieving Sailor

A Dog, the President's Son, and a Grieving Sailor, an Incredible Story from World War II

Sometimes historical research is dry, but often it brings up fascinating stories. While reading excerpts from 1945 issues of Time Magazine, a story grabbed my attention. It involved Antioch, California—the small (at the time) town I used as the hometown for the heroes in my Wings of Glory series. A bit of time over microfiche… Read more »

France’s Other D-Day – Photo Tour of Southern France

Sarah Sundin at the Vieux Port in Marseilles, France, August 2011 (Photo: Sarah Sundin)

When my family had the opportunity to visit Italy and southern France in 2011, I was doubly delighted. Not only could we tour countries I had always longed to see, but I could conduct research for my Wings of the Nightingale series, which follows three World War II flight nurses in the Mediterranean. The third… Read more »

Port Chicago – Desegregation of the US Navy

Crew of destroyer escort USS Mason, the first US warship with a predominately black enlisted crew; Boston Navy Yard, 30 March 1944 (US Naval History and Heritage Command)

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – The Mutiny Trial

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – The Work Stoppage

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Port Chicago – The Explosion

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

The Port Chicago Disaster – Introduction

In the worst Home Front disaster of World War II, an explosion at the Naval Magazine in Port Chicago, California on July 17, 1944 killed 320 men, of whom 202 were black. The tragedy was followed by a work stoppage and a controversial mutiny trial. This sent ripples of change through the segregated armed forces…. Read more »

Courage Under Fire – US Hospitals at Anzio

US hospital dug in at Anzio, Spring 1944 (US Army Medical Department)

Courage under fire. When we hear that phrase, we picture a soldier in the trenches, a sailor manning his guns, or a pilot dodging enemy fighter planes. But how about nurses and physicians? In one of my novels, On Distant Shores, the hero serves as a pharmacist in the US 93rd Evacuation Hospital in World… Read more »

Thanksgiving in World War II

Thanksgiving in World War II: how Thanksgiving was celebrated in the military and on the US home front during World War II.

During World War II, political wrangling over the date to celebrate Thanksgiving, rationing and shortages, restrictions on travel, and disruptions to treasured traditions might have altered plans, but the spirit prevailed. The country paused to gather with family, reflect on blessings, and thank the Lord—the giver of all good gifts. Norman Rockwell’s beautiful “Freedom from… Read more »